2/1/2022

What Can Happen If Someone Gets Your Ip Address

Every device that connects to the internet has an IP (Internet Protocol) address.

What Can Happen If Someone Gets Your Ip Address Password

In addition to helping identify your physical location and potentially causing you harm, an IP address can also compromise your online identity. For example, an IP can be used to keep tabs on what you do online to your detriment. If someone knew you IP address – they could perform a Denial of Service attack on your router. This will flood your connection so that your internet stops working – or at best just slows down to a crawl. You can trace the IP address of the sender of that bomb threat using the email itself,there would be an option in the email content to show all heading instead of just the name and email address of that person then what you have to do is to go to apnic.net to check the server of that IP,if your bro matches the IP,then your bro could be. So, even if a hacker gets your IP address, sneaks into your port through the big back door and gets into your program, that’s as far as they can go. Is there a way to block the door?

They’re needed for devices talk to each other and exchange data.

Your IP address may look like

  • 50.201.69.200 – for IPv4
    or
  • 2001:4860:4000:4uh5:b2fw:0000:8e5d:6432 – for IPv6

– depending on how modern your equipment is.

TIP: Want to know what you IP Address is – check out What is my IP?

But what are the dangers of someone knowing your IP address – and should you hide it?

Denial of Service attack

If someone knew you IP address – they could perform a Denial of Service attack on your router.

This will flood your connection so that your internet stops working – or at best just slows down to a crawl.

This also affects your ISP (Internet Service Provider) – so fortunately most will have systems to detect and manage Denial of Service attacks in their network.

However, these attacks require resources and run the risk of the attacker getting caught and in trouble with their ISP and the law – so fortunately they’re not often directed at home internet connections.

Discover your location

There are online databases which show the geographic location of IP addresses.

Someone with your IP address could uses these to discover your location.

Can

In most cases, these only show your city and state – but this information could be enough to narrow down your identity – such as the school you go to.

Report your IP address as “bad” to websites and services

Some websites, like AbuseIPDB, list “bad” ip addresses – which have been used for hacking, spam and other abusive activity on the Internet.

Someone with you IP address could report it as “bad” – even without you doing anything wrong.

Do this enough times and you’ll have troubles accessing websites which block “bad” IP addresses.

Report your IP address to law enforcement

Taking things a step further – someone with your IP address could also report it as “bad” to law enforcement.

This is unlikely to be taken seriously without evidence – but it still may attract unwanted attention.

Can I be hacked using my IP address?

No – at least least it’s extremely unlikely.

For this to happen you would have to have an existing vulnerability – such as an unsecured router with a default password or open ports.

Fortunately this is extremely rare. Modern routers are designed with security in mind – for example making you set a password before it can be used. And ISP’s often use a firewall to help protect your connection.

Should I hide my IP address?

Sometimes – depending on what you’re doing.

For example, if you’re doing Internet banking you would NOT want to hide your IP address – as you want to have a “clean” connection to the bank. But if you’re browsing websites you don’t trust – YES you should consider hiding your IP address.

The best way to do this is using a VPN – such as Private Internet Access.

Private Internet Access is a highly trusted VPN service which:

  • hides your IP address
  • gives you access via 46 countries – further hiding your location
  • is the only proven no-log VPN service in the world!

I’ve used Private Internet Access for several years and highly recommend them – they offer extreme value for money with prices from $4.42/month.

© Crystal Cox/Business Insider If someone knows your IP address, they can potentially hit you with a DoS attack. Crystal Cox/Business Insider
  • With someone's IP address, you can learn a user's general location, and disable some parts of their internet browsing experience.
  • Every device connected to the internet has an IP address, which helps websites identify your computer.
  • Using third-party programs or services, someone with your IP address could possibly block you from reaching certain websites.
  • If you're concerned about the security of your IP address, consider installing a firewall and VPN.
  • Visit Business Insider's Tech Reference library for more stories.

Every device that connects to the internet has an IP (Internet Protocol) address. The IP address, which is composed of a series of numbers separated by decimal points, looks something like '198.169.0.100.'

This number is used to help devices talk to each other and exchange data. Your network router has its own IP address, of course, as does every device on your network.

But because these identifiers are so important, that means a hacker can potentially use them against you.

Here's what you should know about your IP address, and what it can be used for.

What you can do with an IP address

Firstly: most users won't have to worry about any of this. It's unlikely that any hacker would take the time to learn your specific IP address, and manipulate your specific device. There's no real reward in it for them, so unless they love playing pranks, it would be a waste of time.

What To Do If Someone Gets Your Ip Address

In fact, every website you visit already knows your IP address — that's how they know to load on your computer, as opposed to someone else's.

That said, armed with your IP address, someone has the potential to take certain actions against your network. As such, it's a good idea to keep your IP private from individuals you don't know.

They could:

Block you from accessing websites

It's possible to use your IP address to prevent you from performing certain online activities. The most common example of this is blocking your ability to reach a certain site, or to post messages in forums or the comment section of web sites.

In fact, this is the most common way that website administrators ban rulebreakers. It's often referred to as an 'IP Ban.'

Your IP address can also be used to block or ban you from playing online games on some gaming services.

Learn your general geographic location

Your IP address can reveal your geographic location. In most cases, this won't be any more specific than your city and state. In rare cases, it could be as specific as your neighborhood.

Your IP address also carries the name of your Internet Service Provider (the company that gives you internet access — think Spectrum, or Xfinity).

© whatismyipaddress.com; William Antonelli/Business Insider Your IP address signals where you are. whatismyipaddress.com; William Antonelli/Business Insider

While there's not a lot someone can do with this information, it can be combined with details from other sources to piece together data about your identity.

Perform a Denial of Service Attack

Knowing your IP address, a malicious user may be able to perform a Denial of Service (DoS) attack, in which your network is flooded with data. It prevents normal traffic from getting through and overloads the network's ability to function.

However, these attacks are usually directed at large companies or websites — it's rare that anyone would set up a DoS attack on a regular user.

How to protect your IP address

While there are some risks, your IP address alone poses very limited danger to you or your network. Your IP address can't be used to reveal your identity or specific location, nor can it be used to hack into or remotely take control of your computer.

That said, if you're still concerned, a few simple precautions can help protect you.

First and foremost, your network should be protected with a firewall. Most routers have firewalls built in, but you should contact your router manufacturer or internet service provider to learn about your setup.

For additional protection, you can use Virtual Private Network (VPN) software. A VPN hides your IP address from all outside users, making it extremely difficult for someone to uncover your IP address or monitor your online activity.

© NordVPN; William Antonelli/Business Insider NordVPN is one of the most popular VPN services. NordVPN; William Antonelli/Business Insider

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